COMMUNICATIONS from the Bishop

No. 829          Diocese of Marbel, Philippines                                   14 July 2015

 

CHAPTER SIX: ECOLOGICAL EDUCATION AND SPIRITUALITY

(7th and last installment, Encyclical “Laudato Si’”)

 I. TOWARDS A NEW LIFESTYLE

“A change in lifestyle could bring healthy pressure to bear on those who wield political, economic and social power.  This is what consumer movements accomplish by boycotting certain products.” (n. 206)

“The Earth Charter asked us to leave behind a period of self-destruction and make a new start…this means ‘the awakening of a new reverence for life, the firm resolve to achieve sustainability, the quickening of the struggle for justice and peace, and the joyful celebration of life’.” (n. 207; Earth Charter, The Hague, 2000)

“If we overcome individualism, we will truly be able to develop a different lifestyle and bring about significant changes in society.” (n. 209)

II. EDUCATING FOR THE COVENANT BETWEEN HUMANITY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

“Environmental education has broadened its goals from scientific information, consciousness-raising and prevention of environmental risks” to “a critique of the ‘myths’ of modernity grounded on utilitarian mindset (individualism, unlimited progress, competition, consumerism, the unregulated market).  It seeks to restore the various levels of ecological equilibrium, establishing harmony within ourselves, with others, with nature and other living creatures, and with God.  Environmental education should facilitate making the leap towards the transcendent which gives ecological ethics its deepest meaning.  It needs educators capable of developing an ethics of ecology, and helping people through effective pedagogy, to grow in solidarity, responsibility and compassionate care” (n. 210)

“Only by cultivating sound virtues will people be able to make a selfless ecological commitment.” (n. 211)

“Ecological education can take place in a variety of settings: at school, in families, in the media, in catechesis and elsewhere.” (n. 213)

“All Christian communities have an important role to play in ecological education.” (n. 214)

“…the relationship between a good aesthetic education and the maintenance of a healthy environment cannot be overlooked” (n. 215, 1990 WDP, 14)

III. ECOLOGICAL CONVERSION

“The external deserts in the world are growing because the internal deserts have become so vast” (Benedict XVI, Homily, 2005).  “For this reason, the ecological crisis is also a summons to profound interior conversion.” (n. 217) “Living our vocation to be protector of God’s handiwork is essential to a life of virtue…”(n. 217)

“…a healthy relationship with creation is one dimension of overall personal conversion”, like St. Francis of Assisi (n. 218)

“The ecological conversion needed to bring about lasting change is also a community conversion.” (n. 210)

“This conversion calls for a number of attitudes which together foster a spirit of generous care, full of tenderness.  1st gratitude and gratuitousness, a recognition that the world is God’s loving gift, and that we are called quietly to imitate his generosity of self- sacrifice and good works.’  2nd entails a loving awareness’ that we ‘joined in a splendid universal communion’ with the rest of creatures.” (n. 220)

 IV. JOY AND PEACE

“Christian spirituality proposes a growth marked by moderation and the capacity to be happy with little.” (n. 222)

“Such sobriety, when lived freely and consciously is liberating.” (n. 223)

“Inner peace is closely related to care for ecology and for the common good…because ‘it is reflected in a balanced lifestyle together with a capacity for wonder…” (n. 225) “An integral ecology includes taking time to recover a serene harmony with creation…” (ibid)

 V. CIVIC AND POLITICAL LIFE

“Care for nature is part of a lifestyle which includes the capacity for living together and communion.” (n. 228)

“St. Therese of Lisieux invites us to practice the little way of love…” “An integral ecology is also made up of simple daily gestures…” (n. 230)

“Love, overflowing with small gestures of mutual care, is also civic and political…that seeks to build a better world… a ‘civilization of love’ (Paul VI, WDP, 1997, 68).  Social love is the key to authentic development.” (n. 231)

VI. SACRAMENTAL SIGNS AND THE CELEBRATION OF REST

“The universe unfolds in God…there is a mystical meaning to be found in a leaf, in a mountain trail, in a dewdrop, in a poor person’s face” (n. 233).  St. Bonaventure “contemplation deepens the more we feel the working of God’s grace within our heart, and the better we learn to encounter God in creatures outside ourselves.” (n. 234)

“The Sacraments are a privileged way in which nature is taken up by God to become a means of mediating supernatural life…water, oil, fire and colours are taken up in all their symbolic power and incorporated in our act of praise.” (n. 235)

All that has been created “finds its greatest exaltation in the Eucharist.” (cf. n. 236)

“Sunday, like the Jewish Sabbath, incorporates the value of relaxation and festivity.” (n. 237)

VII. THE TRINITY AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATURES

“The Father is the ultimate source of everything…the Son united himself to this earth…the Spirit inspires and brings new pathways.” (cf. 238)  “When we contemplate with wonder the universe in all its grandeur and beauty, we must praise the whole Trinity” (St. John Paul II, Catechesis, 2004, 4; ibid)

 VIII. QUEEN OF ALL CREATION

“She is the woman ‘clothed in the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars’ (Rev. 12: 1)”.  Carried up into heaven she is Mother and Queen of all creation.

 IX. BEYOND THE SUN

“At the end, we will find ourselves face to face with the infinite beauty of God (cf. 1 Cor. 13: 12), and be able to read with admiration and happiness the mystery of the universe, which with us will share in unending plenitude.  Eternal life will be a shared experience of awe in which each creature, resplendently transfigured will take its rightful place and have something to give those poor men and women who will have been liberated once for all.” (n. 243)

 LAUDATO SIA, MIO SIGNORE!

Back to: 2015 COMMUNICATIONS from the Bishop

Advertisements

About bishopdinualdo

Bishop Dinualdo D. Gutierrez is the Bishop of the Diocese of Marbel
This entry was posted in Earth Spirituality., Encyclical letter, Environment Principles, Environment/Ecology, Laudato Si, Pope, Pope Francis. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s